Saturday, February 6, 2016

Genre: Young Adult Fiction
Publisher: Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Leif and Jason: We have both written throughout our lives. Poetry, short stories, tales, etc., have always been part of the fabric of our family. To be quite frank, we can't imagine a day that would be possible without writing. Like breathing, eating, brushing your teeth, writing is good hygiene for the creative soul. We decided in particular to write this book as we saw a paucity in the genre for well-written literature that is reminiscent of Gulliver's Travels, The Jungle Book, etc. We also have a strong passion for satire (think Swift) and world culture and lore. All this comes together in this first novel of a four-part series.
Is this your first book?
Leif and Jason: Yes, this is our first book, and we want to continue the series and continue writing together! This is the first book in a tetralogy.

With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Leif and Jason: We went with Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing to get our book out to the world. We hope for traditional publishing and feel that this book shows our capabilities as writers. Our goal is to have the entire series published traditionally. 
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Leif and Jason: Like any publishing endeavor, it can be broken down into three steps: 1.) the releasing of the material; 2.) the publicity of the product; and 3.) the tenacity to continue forward no matter what the obstacle.

I feel that the publishing process is rife with pros and cons. One pro is releasing your manuscript to the world. This is a birthing process, a subtle catharsis of letting this creative child out of your safe and warm domicile and into a world that at times can be cold and indifferent. The con for this pro is articulated in the last sentence. Your creative work is your gift, your internal process worked out with your muse; then carefully, slowly, edited, and refined along the way. When the process is complete, your wings unfold, and your gestation is revealed in the published form. To have this child go into an indifferent world can be maddening at times. We cannot escape the fact that new children are born to this world (new ways of thinking in the creative arts) and then not supported. Thelonious Monk felt this and became quite reclusive. We scratch our heads now and ask how is it that people did not see the beauty he created!

What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Leif and Jason: It is hard not to be somewhat skeptical of an industry that has produced so many overly commercial products over the last twenty years and has a demand for fixed formulas. Publishing is such a sacred craft, bringing forth fresh, new and dynamic ways of seeing the world via book form. For instance when you think about what it was in classic literature that first captivated you, you may answer, 'It had me thinking in ways I had not thought before. It was subtly troubling, and with this troubling, a new process of thought enfolded and enabled me to think in a relevant and clear way about the theme presented.'
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Leif and Jason: I believe it is a good start. I also feel that self-publishing and indie publishing apply some pressure to more the traditional publishing industry. It is roughly akin to the survey they did in the 1990's when they found out a huge portion of the American population used alternative medicine in their approach to wellness. Look at the implications of that survey and subsequent studies! Now they offer acupuncture, yoga, qigong, meditation, and indigenous herbology in several medical schools. The pressure from the populace created that change. I am in hopes that the publishing I have listed above will change the traditional publishing to go back to its roots in being pliant and open to new ways of thinking and styles of writing.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Leif and Jason: We impart this advice to aspiring authors: Take your art seriously; refine your abilities, hone your skills and develop a habit of writing on a quotidian basis; not necessarily a piece of art that inspires the pneuma and rattles the firmament but something that is at least adequate or decent. Practicing your craft plays a crucial role in maintaining the well-being and the liveliness of your mental character as well as improving your writing abilities. Let the sensitive fabric of your psyche become pachydermatous and persevere through all the vicissitudes that adversity can muster.  


ABOUT THE BOOK
The Hidden Chalice of the Cloud People is a young adult fantasy comedy novel written by a father and son writing duo for an intelligent general audience. It is the first book in an upcoming tetralogy. It is a darkly humorous, fast-paced, action-packed celebratory unification of the world’s rich cultural lore through the lens of an inventive fantasy concept that stands both as an occasionally subversive satire that satirizes the YA genre and an anachronistic experiment on the fusion of storyline narratives (differing stylistically and compositionally).
When Tommy Dana is abducted into a fantastical realm called Lethia, where the worthy stories of humanity are granted a physical reality, the social media-averse thirteen year old must plunge through a multi-varied meta-fictional adventure in order to save his, and the entire human world’s, imagination from falling into the thieving clutches of the witty supernatural villain Facinorous.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Book Publishing Secrets with Leif and Jason Grundstrom-Whitney, authors of 'The Hidden Chalice of the Cloud People'

Name: Leif and Jason Grundstrom-Whitney
Book Title: The Hidden Chalice of the Cloud People
Genre: Young Adult Fiction
Publisher: Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing
LinksWebsiteFacebookTwitter and Amazon page
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Leif and Jason: We have both written throughout our lives. Poetry, short stories, tales, etc., have always been part of the fabric of our family. To be quite frank, we can't imagine a day that would be possible without writing. Like breathing, eating, brushing your teeth, writing is good hygiene for the creative soul. We decided in particular to write this book as we saw a paucity in the genre for well-written literature that is reminiscent of Gulliver's Travels, The Jungle Book, etc. We also have a strong passion for satire (think Swift) and world culture and lore. All this comes together in this first novel of a four-part series.
Is this your first book?
Leif and Jason: Yes, this is our first book, and we want to continue the series and continue writing together! This is the first book in a tetralogy.

With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Leif and Jason: We went with Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing to get our book out to the world. We hope for traditional publishing and feel that this book shows our capabilities as writers. Our goal is to have the entire series published traditionally. 
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Leif and Jason: Like any publishing endeavor, it can be broken down into three steps: 1.) the releasing of the material; 2.) the publicity of the product;
 and 3.) the tenacity to continue forward no matter what the obstacle.

I feel that the publishing process is rife with pros and cons. One pro is releasing your manuscript to the world. This is a birthing process, a subtle catharsis of letting this creative child out of your safe and warm domicile and into a world that at times can be cold and indifferent. The con for this pro is articulated in the last sentence. Your creative work is your gift, your internal process worked out with your muse; then carefully, slowly, edited, and refined along the way. When the process is complete, your wings unfold, and your gestation is revealed in the published form. To have this child go into an indifferent world can be maddening at times. We cannot escape the fact that new children are born to this world (new ways of thinking in the creative arts) and then not supported. Thelonious Monk felt this and became quite reclusive. We scratch our heads now and ask how is it that people did not see the beauty he created!

What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Leif and Jason: It is hard not to be somewhat skeptical of an industry that has produced so many overly commercial products over the last twenty years and has a demand for fixed formulas. Publishing is such a sacred craft, bringing forth fresh, new and dynamic ways of seeing the world via book form. For instance when you think about what it was in classic literature that first captivated you, you may answer, 'It had me thinking in ways I had not thought before. It was subtly troubling, and with this troubling, a new process of thought enfolded and enabled me to think in a relevant and clear way about the theme presented.'
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Leif and Jason: I believe it is a good start. I also feel that self-publishing and indie publishing apply some pressure to more the traditional publishing industry. It is roughly akin to the survey they did in the 1990's when they found out a huge portion of the American population used alternative medicine in their approach to wellness. Look at the implications of that survey and subsequent studies! Now they offer acupuncture, yoga, qigong, meditation, and indigenous herbology in several medical schools. The pressure from the populace created that change. I am in hopes that the publishing I have listed above will change the traditional publishing to go back to its roots in being pliant and open to new ways of thinking and styles of writing.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Leif and Jason: We impart this advice to aspiring authors: Take your art seriously; refine your abilities, hone your skills and develop a habit of writing on a quotidian basis; not necessarily a piece of art that inspires the pneuma and rattles the firmament but something that is at least adequate or decent. Practicing your craft plays a crucial role in maintaining the well-being and the liveliness of your mental character as well as improving your writing abilities. Let the sensitive fabric of your psyche become pachydermatous and persevere through all the vicissitudes that adversity can muster.  




Friday, January 29, 2016

Book Publishing Secrets with Robert V Baynes, Author of 'The Day the Dollar Died'

Name: Robert V Baynes
Book Title: The Day the Dollar Died
Genre: Political / Christian Novel
Publisher: Self published
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Robert : I felt like I had a message I needed to get out. I decided that putting it in story form would be the easiest to read and could get the message across the best.
Is this your first book?
Robert: Yes
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Robert: I published it on create space. I chose that because I had heard the stories of authors who spent years trying to get a publisher to publish their work and sometimes never getting it published.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Robert: The good thing about self publishing like I did is that it is relatively easy to get the book to market on Amazon. The bad thing is that it is very difficult to publicize the book and get people to know about it.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Robert: People sometimes think that writing a book is hard and quite an accomplishment. Actually, writing the book is the easy part. Getting people to know about the book and to buy it is the hard part.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Robert: Probably, but I would warn them that this is only the beginning.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Robert: First of all, make sure that your book is good enough to cause people to want to read it. If you have a good product, then you will have to work very hard to promote it. It is a long process and doesn’t usually happen overnight.

/////////////////////////////////////
Title: The Day the Dollar Died
Genre: Political/ Christian  Fiction
Author: Robert V Baynes
ABOUT THE BOOK
This is a novel about an ordinary farmer who finds that his country is changing and it affects his own life. He loses more than he ever imagined and has to make some hard choices to save his family.
The main character is John Birch and he has a pretty good life. He has a great wife and children and is doing pretty well financially. He gets to do a job he loves and still spends time with his family. He finds that circumstances beyond his control change his world so that he ends up losing the financial security he worked so hard to build up. All he has left is his family and now he has to risk everything to try to save them from an ever growing government.
This book is very realistic and follows a line of thinking  that many find very logical and possibly inevitable.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Book Publishing Secrets with Georges Ugeux, Author of 'The Flying Dragon'

Name: Georges Ugeux
Book Title: The Flying Dragon
Genre: Mystery Novel
Publisher: Archway Publications
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
I always wanted to do it but I have such a high esteem for literature that I thought I probably wouldn’t be able to write a novel. The evening I began writing my novel, I had just finished my non-fiction book, International Finance Regulation. It was a huge undertaking and a great relief.
What inspired me to write a few pages of a novel? Let alone, a mystery novel? I think I must have had something I wanted to communicate…and doing it under the fiction umbrella seemed like a great way to do it. After three chapters and a dozen pages, I printed it and read it. It didn’t sound that bad at all…and definitely felt the need to continue.
Another element of inspiration: my eldest daughter. She had a real gift as a writer but passed away when she was 35. She would have been a great French author. Maybe I wanted to carry the torch?
Is this your first book?
I wrote my first book in London in 1981. Floating Rate Notes was written for Euromoney Publications with a reedition in 1985. After my first publication, I began writing essays and articles. After the financial crisis, I published my first essay in 2009 with Odile Jacob in French: The Betrayal of Finance. It was translated in Dutch and English.
In addition to my books, articles and essays, I am also a regular blogger in France (Le Monde.fr) and in the United States (Huffington Post). I am interviewed often as an “expert” in global finance because in addition to being knowledgeable, I have an independent view and can see the broader picture (and sometimes the manipulation of financiers and politicians).
When I began teaching at Columbia Law School, I published International Finance Regulation, published by Wiley & Sons, Inc in 2014. I am currently working on a new non-fiction book on Central Banking.
The Flying Dragon is my first novel.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
For fiction authors, it is a daunting task to publish one’s first novel. I attempted to find a literary agent but almost all declined without reading the few pages I sent. I think many agents are limiting themselves to established authors and have become risk-adverse.
Without a literary agent, it is unlikely that publishers will look at a manuscript. They too are in the blockbusters business and seem to have little interest in new authors.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
I decided to self-publish and keep the rights. I chose Archway Publishing because they are a subsidiary of Simon and Schuster which gave me confidence in the quality of their service. They did a fine job.
I currently have a contract with a Chinese publisher who will be translating it in Chinese (the plot is set in Hong Kong). Additionally, the French version will be finished by the end of December. I plan to approach publishers in January and am targeting Easter as a publication date in France.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
The publishing industry in the United States is undertaking a serious revision and its future is unclear. It is shrinking and acquisitions are seriously reducing the diversity of choices. We live in a world of diverse formats. I am using Audible (an Amazon company) for my audiobook version of The Flying Dragon.
Publishers have sliced their offerings. Often enough they subcontract between editorial, publishing and marketing, and they even slice marketing. It is close to impossible to one human contact for the entire journey. I had to learn how to manage the various contacts and departments.
Writing can be a very solitary exercise. I feel fortunate to have had friends around me who were excited by the prospect of the book.
As a small publisher, it is extremely difficult to distribute a book. It has become very clear that distribution is direct result of great publicity, online presence and social media. Getting one’s book on the shelves at Barnes & Noble is nearly impossible (unless you are already an established author).
I chose to manage social media myself and to hire a traditional media publicist, specializing in the mystery genre. Working with a real person is extremely important to me. The US publishing industry is completely product-driven - the author and book are treated like products. Fortunately, my credibility in the world of finance (the world in which the plot takes place) gave me a bit of an edge and I was taken seriously.
With the importance of e-books, the industry will need to transform its culture and its practices. If they do not begin to focus more on the authors, we will all choose to self-publish.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
I would recommend it. There are very cheap ways to get published and it is not likely that one’s first novel will be published by one of the major publishing companies.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
It took me six months to admit that I had no choice but to self-publish. It is not as gratifying, at least initially, but in my opinion, it is a waste of time to focus on literary agents and major publishing houses.
The internet and social media make it both easier and cheaper to do it yourself.
Be sure you to have plenty of help on the editorial side. Creating a well written, succinct, and polished novel is not easy. If writing is truly a passion, just do it. Work hard and utilize all of your existing relationships and networks. If your manuscript is ready to go, launch it!

////////////////////////////////
Title:  THE FLYING DRAGON
Genre:  THRILLER/SUSPENSE
Author:  Georges Ugeux
Publisher:  Archway Books
Find out more on Amazon
About the Book: 
Celebrated non-fiction author Georges Ugeux delivers an intense, imaginative and intriguing financial thriller in his debut novel, The Flying Dragon.  Set against the backdrop of the high-energy, high-tension world of global finance, The Flying Dragon plunges readers deep into a world where power, greed, money, and passion can intersect in a most dangerous way.
The Flying Dragon introduces protagonist Victoria Leung, a beautiful, brilliant, fearless, and highly accomplished financial fraud investigator.  Responsible for taking down Sun Hung Kai Properties’ Kwok Brothers, a real estate empire, Victoria not only established herself as a formidable talent, but earned the nickname “The Flying Dragon” in the process. When she leaves the fraud department of the Hong Kong Police, Victoria accepts a position as a senior detective at Pegasus, an international security firm based in London.  The Pegasus job affords Victoria much-needed freedom, but that calm is shattered when Victoria receives an urgent message from her close friend Diana Yu. It seems Diana’s ex- boyfriend Henry Chang is in danger.  Henry’s co-worker, Bertrand Wilmington, head of the derivative trading desk of a global bank, has fallen from a window of the twenty-second floor trading room.The Hong Kong Police Force quickly concludes that the death was a suicide, but is there more to this story than meets the eye? Henry Chang thinks so—and knows that if anyone can find answers, it’s Victoria, the Flying Dragon herself. Hong Kong and Mainland authorities are unsuccessful in cracking the case, but Victoria uses her expertise to discover key clues. And Victoria, a dogged, tough, tenacious investigator, won’t back down until she gets answers. As she races to piece together the puzzle of what really happened, Victoria is swept up in a world of danger, deception, and deadly consequences.   Can she extricate herself from this perilous web of arrogance, power, money and greed? Will she expose the corruption and bring down a financial giant?  Or will time run out? The clock is ticking….

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Book Publishing Secrets with Tracy Weber, Author of 'Karma's a Killer'

Name: Tracy Weber
Book Title: Karma’s a killer
Genre: Cozy Mystery
Publisher: Midnight Ink
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Tracy:  The idea to write a mystery series came to me on a rainy evening about five years ago, while in the middle of a brutal workout at my favorite health club. I was pedaling away, reading a Susan Conant novel to distract myself from the evil exercise bike, when a quote in Black Ribbon about crazy dog people made me burst out loud laughing. I knew I’d found my author soul mate.  Someone who truly got me.

I went home, looked her up online, and stumbled across a site about cozy mysteries. As I read about hundreds of other wonderful cozy series, I began to wonder: What would happen if a yoga teacher with a crazy dog like mine got mixed up in murder? Kate Davidson and Bella popped into my head a few days later. The rest is history.

Is this your first book?
Tracy: No. Karma’s a Killer is the third book in my Downward Dog Mystery series, with hopefully many more to come in the future. I currently have a contract for six books in the series.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Tracy: My publisher, Midnight Ink, falls somewhere between traditional and small press, I believe. It’s not one of the big four publishers, but it’s very well regarded in the mystery field. It was important to me to see my books on the shelves of bookstores and libraries, so I wanted to go the traditional route. However I wouldn’t hesitate to self publish either. There are pros and cons to both.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Tracy: Everything happened so fast, which was both fabulous and a little crazy-making. I signed with my agent, Margaret Bail of Inklings Literary Agency, only a month or two after I started submitting the manuscript, and she sold the series within a month of sending it to publishers.
I wish I’d had more time to learn about the industry before I signed on the dotted line with an agent and agreed to a three (and now six) book contract. Ultimately, I probably would have made the same choices, but I would have felt better prepared, especially when it came to negotiating the contract.
So the biggest advice I would give to new writers is make sure that you do your research. It may take you years to find the right agent or publisher, or you may have one in weeks. You need to know what criteria would make you say yes or no to their offers.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Tracy: I think I’ve answered that above, though I would add that the publishing industry constantly changes, faster than anyone can keep up with it. Any lessons that I learned when I signed my first contract three years ago are null and void now. Amazon continues to roll out new programs, some of which are great for writers, others of which are still to be determined. And social media channels pop up and change faster than I can learn how to log on to them. So I’d say be prepared to strap on your rocket suit and hang on for the ride.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Tracy: I’m very glad I’m traditionally published, but it’s not the right solution if you’re a control freak. Once you sell your work to a publisher, you give up both creative and marketing control. In return, you get marketing and editorial expertise, a little prestige, and a potential path onto the shelves of major booksellers. If you decide to self publish, you need to be more than a writer. Successful self publishers are small business owners who spend as much time editing, formatting, and marketing their books as they do writing them. It’s all about trade-offs.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Tracy: Don’t give up!  Writing is a TOUGH business.  No one gets published without facing rejection.  When I was trying to land an agent, I allowed myself 24 hours to feel bad about every rejection, then I forced myself to do something proactive. Send out another letter, connect with another author, write another page. 

You can’t please everyone, and yet when you write, you so desperately want to.  (At least I do.)  Just keep writing what you love and know that your work isn’t defined by what any one person thinks of it.


Above all else, have fun! If you have fun on your writing journey, you will be successful—even if you never make it to The New York Times Bestseller list.

Monday, December 21, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Russell James, Author of 'Q Island'

Author photo Q Island Release
Book Title: Q Island
Genre: Horror
Publisher: Samhain Publishing, LTD.
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Russell: My wife talked me into starting to write. When we were on long car drives, I would tell her stories I outlined in my head. One day, she told me I should write them down and get them published. I told her no one would ever want to read anything I wrote. We see how that turned out.
Q Island is post-apocalyptic and I was inspired when I saw what happened in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit. Society imploded in hours. I wondered what would happen if that occurred on a larger scale, and with an event that would keep the isolation permanent. I picked my old stomping ground, Long Island, NY, and off I went.
Is this your first book?
Russell: No, this is my sixth novel. I also have a two novellas published, three short story collections and I am in several other short story collections.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Russell: Q Island is traditionally published through Samhain Horror. I have self-published works, but with traditional publishing, I really like that all I had to do was write. Covers, editing, layout, and especially distribution, are someone else’s headache. Q Island is available all over the world in multiple formats including trade paperback and soon audiobook. I could never do all that myself.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Russell: I had two short stories accepted for publication in small venues. I’d had several novel manuscripts turned down by multiple agents and publishers. I was taking what I discovered was a much needed writing class, and the teacher mentioned that the legendary Don D’Auria was starting up a horror line at Samhain and had an open call. So I went back and applied my new-found skills to fixing my latest, a manuscript called Dark Inspiration. It hadn’t seen the light of day yet, so I figured why not get rejected by someone famous first. I sent it to Samhain and nearly had a heart attack when it was accepted.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Russell: Since I’ve also self-published in tandem with the novels and novella done traditionally, I’ve seen both sides of the business.
Traditional publishing is slow. Even though my imprint is quicker than most, the contract to release time is still a year. But as mentioned before, the publisher does do all the work for you except the writing. You invest no money in traditional publishing. Traditional publishing can also get your book almost everywhere. Note that unless you are with a Big Six publisher (or however many there are today) you won’t be seeing your book in Walmart, Barnes and Noble or an airport bookshop. Those spots are for Mr. King, Mr. Patterson, and Mr. Sparks.
Self-publishing is more work, because you will do everything. Or, if you are sharp, you will pay some expert to do the things you are not expert at, like cover art and editing. That means you will invest money. Distribution is more time consuming, and getting paper books into a brick and mortar store is a virtual impossibility. But all the royalties are yours. And you can publish exactly what you want to.
In both instances, getting people to know who you are, and that you have written a book, is an uphill battle. A publisher helps, but even the big ones leave a lot of the marketing up to you. And I’ve yet to read about anyone finding the golden key that unlocks that door.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Russell: For first timers, I’d go the traditional route with short stories and longer works through respected publishers. It is important to get good enough to get past that gatekeeper. It is too easy to self-publish something awful, and then is out there forever. There are good self-published works out there, but there are far more poor ones. Often, what the author thinks is gold is really still straw.
I had a manuscript for a novel I thought was great. Everyone I sent it to passed on it. Four years later I re-read the synopsis and thought, “Yeah, that was good!” So I took it out, thought I’d polish it for a month and sent it out. I re-read the manuscript and it was awful. I cut 20,000 useless words out of it and completely re-wrote one of the heroes. So those gatekeepers I cursed years earlier really did me a favor. The rewritten novel was published to great acclaim as Dreamwalker.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Russell: Write every day. Fiction, not blog posts, Facebook rants or anything else. Those don’t count. Then read every day. Not just inside your genre, but outside as well. You will absorb style tips through osmosis.
Most important, be prepared to get better. And the only way to do that is by people telling you what’s not working. Those people are doing you an invaluable service. Thank them and give them a hug. Then fix what you screwed up and try again.



Thursday, December 10, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Children's Author Donna McDine

Book Title: Dee and Deb Off They Go Kindergarten First Day Jitters
Genre: children’s
Publisher: Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Donna: As long as I can remember I have always enjoyed immersing myself in books and I hope to invoke the same feelings into my readers.
Is this your first book?
Donna: No, this is my fifth children’s book.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Donna: I went the small press route with Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. I went with Guardian Angel Publishing because I immediately was drawn to the family feel and care Lynda Burch takes with her authors and illustrators.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Donna: Patience intertwined with determination of learning the writing craft and not rushing the process is essential. The road to publication is a long one. Depending on the speed of your publisher, from the time of submission, to hopefully editing process then publication in my experience it can take anywhere from one to three years for your book to see the light of day, especially if illustrations are involved.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Donna: Everyone’s experience on publishing rollercoaster is unique. Don’t be so worried about comparing yourself to others. Success comes in all shapes. Write what you love. Study publisher submission guidelines and follow them to the letter. This is not time to think outside the box. Publisher submission guidelines are in place for a reason. Adhere to them.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other Donnas?
Donna: It honestly depends what your wants and needs are. As for me, the experience with a small publisher has been a positive one.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring Donnas?
Donna: Seek out writer critique groups, attend workshops and join the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. The wealth of information and assistance is outstanding!
Thank you for interviewing me. I enjoyed visiting with you and your readers.


Title: Dee and Deb Off They Go Kindergarten First Day Jitters
Genre: children’s
Author: Donna McDine
Publisher: Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
About the Book: The anxiety of finding one’s own place and friends in kindergarten without the comfort of having her fraternal twin sister nearby at first overwhelms Dee until she realizes even without her fraternal twin sister, Dee and her classmates for the most part are in the same boat.