Thursday, February 26, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Nicole Weaver, author of 'Not All Americans Are Racist'

Nicole weaver is an award-winning author. Her first trilingual book Marie and Her Friend the Sea Turtle was published in 2009. Her love for languages and other cultures resulted in publishing the award-winning book, My Sister Is My Best Friend which was published in 2011 by Guardian Angel Publishing and has won numerous awards.
My Brother Is My Best Friend, published by Guardian Angel Publishing, January 2014, earned the 2014 Children’s Literary Classics Seal of Approval, and the 2014 Children’s Literary Classics Gold Award. The book also earned a bronze medal in 2014 Readers’ Favorite International Book Awards.
About the book:
In Not All Americans Are Racist, Nicole Weaver recounts her experiences with racial discrimination and the non-racist white individuals who made it possible for her to attend and finish college. As an immigrant from Port-au-Prince, Haiti, she is thankful for the opportunities America has offered her.
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Nicole:  I have written mostly trilingual children’s picture books. After the killings of Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner, I was inspired to write my first nonfiction book about my own experiences with racism.
Is this your first book?
Nicole: No, but this is my first nonfiction book.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Nicole: I self-published, because I believe this topic is too important to wait to publish. Going with a traditional publisher could take years.  The United States is going through hard times with racial issues right now; I am convinced my well-balanced book can be an inspiration to both the young and old.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Nicole:  I self-published my first children’s trilingual book, I would definitely not go that road again, because it is very expensive.  However, it is much easier to self-publish other genre.  I will continue to self-publish nonfiction books because it is much easier.  It is wise to write on topics that are current because it will garner a lot of interest.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Nicole: Be very aware of con artists.  Do your research and always hire someone that has a good reputation and perhaps recommendations from friends.  Many people are looking to make a small fortune off the backs of eager writers.  I have been burned badly when it came to getting my book professionally edited, so my advice only hires someone that a friend recommends. I feel very lucky to have found a great individual who is very good at the craft of editing.  I also have a great individual that does a great job formatting my book. Lastly, you also need a book cover designer.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Nicole: Yes, I would! Just be sure to hire someone you can trust.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Nicole: Write about things you are passionate about.  Make time to write every day.  Even though I teach high school, I make time to write at least one to two hours each day.  Writing daily helps me avoid writer’s block.  I used to only write during vacation, but it would take me too long to overcome writer’s block.  Writing can be very therapeutic too.  I use it as a form of stress release. Some people grab a glass of wine to relax.  I grab my laptop.



Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Robert Lane, author of COOLER THAN BLOOD

Sharing his publishing secrets today is Florida-based suspense author Robert Lane. His latest novel is Cooler Than BloodHe is also the author of The Second Letter. Connect with Robert on the web:

Greetings, Robert! Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Robert: I wrote short stories in college and always felt as if I returned to writing, not as if I just started. I enjoy the creative process, and, like most writers, write compulsively. I don’t dwell on the root of those compulsions; I enjoy what I do and am thoroughly challenged by it. That’s enough for me.
Is this your first book?
Robert: No. The Second Letter came out last year. That’s not counting the two in the drawer.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Robert: I set up Mason Alley Publishing, LLC to publish all my work. It allows me to own, control, and to profit from my work. I believe the short-term disadvantages are greatly outweighed by the long-term benefits. One thing that digital and on-demand publishing has done is to immortalize all books. Time horizons have grown exponentially.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Robert: The con is the myth of self-publishing. Great, I’m self-published; I outsource social media, traditional media, copy-editing, cover design, web design and maintenance; nearly everything other than writing and marketing dollar allocation. It is a steep learning curve and I’m still climbing. The pros? I own this baby, good or bad, forever.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Robert: Keep in mind that there is more money being made telling you how to write, publish, and market than you are likely to ever make writing. With that inside your head, choose your weapons carefully. How best to market yourself? Who to listen to? Where to spend those precious dollars? Do not let the publishing industry decide those, or other issues, for you. No one will match the passion you have for your work. That’s not cynicism; it’s the simple truth. Embrace it and move on.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Robert: Certainly, but bear in mind, with any publishing venue, you need to vigorously engage your business side. Segregate your time and energy—for you need to approach the business end with the same madness in which you write.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Robert: Read about the lives and journeys of other authors. I have a list I continually update of authors’ struggles, work habits, lessons, and victories and defeats. Take console in those who have gone before you as well as those who travel with you. If you think you’re alone, remember Harry Truman’s words; “The only think new in the world is the history you don’t know.”



Monday, February 16, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with John Herrick, Author of 'Between these Walls'

A self-described "broken Christian," John Herrick battled depression since childhood. In that context, however, he developed intuition for themes of spiritual journey and the human heart.

Herrick graduated from the University of Missouri—Columbia. Rejected for every writing position he sought, he turned to information technology and fund development, where he cultivated analytical and project management skills that helped shape his novel-writing process. He seized unpaid opportunities writing radio commercial copy and ghostwriting for two nationally syndicated radio preachers.

The Akron Beacon Journal hailed Herrick's From the Dead as "a solid debut novel." Published in 2010, it became an Amazon bestseller. The Landing, a semifinalist in the inaugural Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award contest, followed.

Herrick's nonfiction book 8 Reasons Your Life Matters introduced him to new readers worldwide. The free e-book surpassed 100,000 downloads and hit #1 on Amazon's Motivational Self-Help and Christian Inspiration bestseller lists. Reader response prompted a trade paperback.

His latest novel, Between These Walls, returns readers to Hudson, Ohio, to which he introduced them in From the Dead.

Herrick admits his journey felt disconnected. "It was a challenge but also a growth process," he acknowledges. "But in retrospect, I can see God's fingerprints all over it."

Visit John Herrick at www.JohnHerrick.net or at his blog, johnherricknet.blogspot.com. Connect with him on Facebook or @JohnHerrick. 

Find out more on Amazon.

Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
John:
I love people, and characters give me the opportunity to explore them in a way that encourages readers. I fell in love with writing as a kid, and at 10 years old, I decided I wanted to become a novelist. It took another 25 years of practice, tangents, experimentation and endurance before I saw my first book on the shelf!
Regarding why I penned Between These Walls, we tend to see a gay man’s experience at the surface. We seldom hear about the emotional, spiritual or social aspects that churn inside him. Between These Walls offers readers a rare glimpse into the internal, psychological struggle of Hunter Carlisle, a gay main character, from his youth to adulthood, and walks with him as he reconciles his feelings in light of his faith.
The book includes an Author’s Note, which tells the story behind the novel. I’ve also posted it at my website here:  http://www.JohnHerrick.net/betweenthesewalls/authornote.htm
Is this your first book?
John:
It’s my third novel to hit the shelves. My nonfiction book, 8 Reasons Your Life Matters, is also available. Meanwhile, a fourth novel is in the revision phase—I’ve relegated that poor victim to the back burner so many times over the last decade!
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
John:                                                                          
It’s a small indie press and was the avenue that opened to me. It’s proven a perfect fit for the early stage in my career. It offers the flexibility to take risks and explore characters in less conventional ways, which has helped me learn what resonates with readers.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
John:
Every writer’s journey is different. I consider myself one of the least-qualified writers out there. I never took a creative writing course. Nowadays, I read reference books on writing to improve my skills, but when I sat down to create my first novel, I hadn’t researched how to do it. I didn’t have a clue what I was doing. If you read the first-draft pages of the first novel I attempted, The Landing, which are posted on my website, you’ll find a sample of that raw content and my first attempt to fix it. But it gave me the chance to test my creative instincts. As I reached the end of that first draft, I studied facets of how to construct a novel, then built them into my revision processes, one by one, as I acquired each skill.
I held on to my dream for a couple of decades. The key factor that enabled me to complete a novel was the years I spent doing IT work—computer programming, project management, analysis. My biggest obstacles to completing a long-term project, such as a novel, were my lack of self-discipline and my aversion to creative planning. IT work knocked that out of me, because you’re thrown into a situation where you can’t give up until the computer program works. And computers don’t compromise! Since my passions don’t reside with computer work, I wouldn’t want to repeat the experience, but I also wouldn’t trade it for anything. I learned so much during those years. And the lessons I learned—the specific lessons I needed for my journey—wouldn’t have occurred in a creative writing course. Obviously, God is much smarter than I am!
Regarding pros and cons, I’ll start with the con, because it leads up to the pro. The biggest downside is the abundance of rejection you’ll face. Some will think you’re not a strong writer, but most will reject you for subjective reasons—they have a limited number of “yes” cards they can use. Rejection hurts, and early on, it hurts badly. But once you grow accustomed to it, it becomes part of the background noise and doesn’t disturb you like it used to. So if you see an author with a book on the shelf, chances are they’ve developed thick skin and had to fight for years to see that book on the shelf. It’s critical to decide in advance that you refuse to give up, because you’ll feel like giving up often! Remember those multiple-choice tests in school, where it was a no-brainer to eliminate Choice D, because you knew it was the wrong answer? I considered quitting my Choice D, eliminated it outright.
That leads to the biggest pro along the journey: You have the opportunity to overcome rejection and grow stronger. You’ll discover you can endure things that would have knocked you out 10 years ago. And that strength will spill over into other areas of your life. Because you’ll understand rejection, you’ll have the opportunity to encourage others.
Listen to your heart. I’m convinced you’ll end up in the right place at the right time if you’re in tune with the true, honest desires of your heart.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
John:
I treasure my situation much more than I would have 10 years ago. Every time a book hits the shelf, I value that accomplishment because I know the time investment it required, and I recall the years waiting to see that happen. I treasure the relationships God has brought into my life—readers I’ve talked to, industry people who offered words of encouragement at the right times, bloggers I’ve had the privilege to know, friends who have cheered me on. In the end, the final book and the process behind it boils down to the people you encounter along the way. For every book you see, you can find relationships behind it.
As a writer, you don’t always fit in. You’re an artist—and let’s face it, artists are just odd! Novel writing is an unconventional career choice and an uphill climb. Companies post a lot of job openings, but I’ve never seen one that said, “Wanted: Novel Writer”. So you’re on your own. You don’t think the way others do or perceive your workday the same way. While the people around you find fulfillment and a career track at their day jobs, getting paid to build their career step by step, you’re still sacrificing your leisure time, walking by faith, betting everything on an unseen reality. That leaves you feeling isolated and foolish. But as early breakthroughs unfold, you start to surround yourself with more people who think along similar lines, and you realize you’re not alone; you’re simply in a very small minority.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
John:
Absolutely. Every author harbors stories, motivations and goals in his/her heart. Some avenues in publishing are better suited than others for your particular vision and level of preparation. It’s a matter of finding the best fit for you, keeping an eye on both the present and the future, with a willingness to adapt and be patient along the way. You can always grow, so don’t despise the day of small things.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
John:
“Never give up!” It’s the advice I’d give to anyone who has a dream. Decide in advance that quitting isn’t an option for you.


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Marija Bulatovic, author of Fantastical: Tales of Bears, Beer and Hemophilia

Born in Yugoslavia in the 1970s, Marija Bulatovic, along with her parents, immigrated to the U.S. in the 1990s just ahead of the 1990s Yugoslav wars and the breakup of the country.  An accomplished business professional with years of experience driving enterprise business with Fortune 500 companies, Bulatovic graduated from Colgate University. Marija Bulatovic lives in Seattle with her husband and son.


Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Marija: While I didn’t set out to pursue career as an author, I was moved to do so after the birth of my son.  FANTASTICAL is a legacy to my son, as his birth was the catalyst for the book. 

These stories were born with my son.  Uncertain upon entering a wholly new phase of life, I sought wisdom and enlightenment – and a break from the daily routine of feedings, lack of sleep, and disorientation.  I was in search of something that would lift my spirit, make me laugh, and transport me, if only for a moment, to another, less tangible, place and time. 

While the world in which these stories unfold no longer exists, I still cling to the many lessons it taught me.  Because of my fantastical childhood, I know in my heart that life is much more than a sum of mundane survival activities.  I know that it’s fluid, magical, brimming with love and connection. 

This book was indeed the respite I needed.  It freed my mind to roam the wild landscape of a bygone era and lifted me on the wings of Balkan stardust.  I hope it will do the same for my readers.  My hope is that stories amuse and transport my readers, sustaining them on their journey as they have me on mine. 

Is this your first book?
Marija: Yes, it is.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Marija: I chose to self-publish.  FANTASTICAL is a work of passion and a very personal and dear project to me.  As such, I was interested to personally and deeply become involved in all aspects of publishing, from identifying the right experts to edit, illustrate, layout, and print the book to working with a tremendously talented publicist to bring it to light. 
At the same time, we are experiencing an explosion in tools and services suited for first time and self-publishing authors. 
I was curious about this process and it gave me an excellent opportunity to be personally engaged throughout the journey and understands all aspects of publishing. It’s been a great learning experience!
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Marija: Self-publishing is tremendously labor and time intensive, but also very rewarding and profitable, assuming one is able to make investments to get the book to the finish line.
The pros are that you, as an author are 100% in control of your book and the every aspect of it.  You are the final decision maker and owner of the outcomes-good and bad. It’s a wonderful opportunity to merge one’s creative talents with flawless execution.  It does require much self-discipline and hard work, but it’s also a rewarding process.  While the world of self-publishing tools and services can feel like a maze, once the author understands them, they are generally easy and efficient to you.
The cons are that you have to invest money, time and energy to personally research and identify everything that shapes the book: editors, publicists, designers, printers, distributors, etc.  This is no easy task and authors can feel discouraged by it and by the long road ahead.  The self-publish path also requires that you make personal investments or raise money to fund your book project-which done right, is not an inexpensive proposition. 
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Marija: The publishing industry overall is at an inflection point, destabilized by the explosion of self-published books and outlets offering self-publishing services.  Self-publishing houses such as CreateSpace, Lightning Source or Bookbaby offer quality services at an approachable price-point.  However, the learning curve is steep for a single author to learn, discern differences in offerings and advantages among these services, along with their complementary or duplicative nature.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Marija: Yes, most definitely.  If you feel ready and passionate about your book, you will enjoy the leanrings and the process that goes with self-publishing.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Marija: Just do it! Write your book, engage deeply with your project, commit to your work of passion and see what happens.  Most likely, more good things will happen than if you don’t embark on the journey.  And most importantly, Good Luck!



Sunday, January 18, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Linda DeFruscio, author of 'Cornered: Dr. Richard J. Sharpe As I Knew Him'

Linda DeFruscio is the founder and president of A & A Laser, Electrolysis & Skin Care Associates in Newtonville, MA. In addition to Cornered, her memoir about her friendship with Richard Sharpe, she is currently writing a book on skin care and completing a book of profiles based on interviews with transgender people, many of whom are her clients. While Cornered is her first book, her skin care articles have been published in magazines for years. Connect with the author on Facebook and via her website.

About the Book
In the year 2000, Linda DeFruscio was forced to make an unthinkable decision. Someone whose genius she admired immensely, a business associate and dear friend, committed a terrible crime. In response, she could cut off their friendship and avoid the risk of losing friends, clients and her own peace of mind—or, she could trust her gut and try to save some aspect of her friend’s humanity.
Cornered is Linda DeFruscio’s story of her long and often complex association with Dr. Richard J. Sharpe, the millionaire dermatologist from Gloucester, MA who was convicted of killing his wife. Beautifully written and surprisingly tender, Corneredallows the reader an upfront view of the fragility of genius and the decline into madness, all while casting a second light on how one woman’s refusal to turn her back resulted in momentous changes in her own life.
Find out more on Amazon.

Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Author: I am an electrologist (someone who removes unwanted hair from clients’ bodies) and an aesthetician (someone who helps clients enhance their skin and features so that they can be their most beautiful selves). Over the course of my 35-year career, I have written many articles on skin care and other aesthetic matters for various magazines. So, when I lived through a unique and challenging decade-long experience that I knew would make for a really great book, I already had some writing skills. And because I am detail oriented by nature, I also had lots of notes. Getting started was not that difficult for me. I had my ducks in a row, so to speak.
Is this your first book?
Author: Yes, but I am currently working on two others. One will be about skin care and the other, which is nearly done, is a compilation of profiles of transgender people. So many of my clients are transgender people, and some of them were anxious to tell me their stories so they could share their experience with readers. I’m very excited about this project. It is a true labor of love, for me as well as for the people who appear in it.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Author: Because I have my own business and work long hours, I didn’t have the time or inclination to self publish. I had one of my associates contact some publishers and three of them responded with offers of contracts. I looked them over and decided that Twilight Times Books was the best fit for me.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Author: The journey is a long one once you decide to go with a traditional press. It took almost a year from the time my book was accepted at Twilight Times to see it out in print (and in online stores). But in that time it went through a couple of edits with really good editors who gave me a lot of advice for improvements as well as line edits, a variety of cover art options, etc., and now the publisher is sending it out to various reviewers on my behalf. So it is time well spent.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Author: I learned that there are too many people writing and not enough reading. It’s a challenge to get published by a traditional publisher. I’m sure self publishing is easier if you have the time to learn the ropes. But I think it’s also harder in the sense that many readers and reviewers make assumptions about self-published books and don’t give them the chance most of them deserve.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Author: If you’re in a hurry, self publish. If you have the time, explore other options. Writing can be a very lonely process. When you work with a publisher you suddenly have a team of people who care about the success of your book almost as much as you do.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Author: Don’t give up. Go after your dream. Persevere. The rewards for me have been huge, even though the book is barely out at this time. Not only did I accomplish what I set out to do, but in the process I discovered answers to questions that had plagued me for years.    



Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Book Publishing Secrets with Harris Kern, Author of 'Going From Undisciplined to Self-Mastery: Five Simple Steps to Get You There'

Harris Kern is recognized as the foremost authority on providing practical guidance for solving management issues and challenges. He has devoted over 30 years helping professionals build competitive organizations. His client list reads like a who’s who of American and International Business. His client list includes Standard and Poor’s, GE, The Weather Channel, NEWS Corporation, Hong Kong Air Cargo Terminal (HACTL), among hundreds of other Fortune500 and Global 2000 companies. He pioneered theDiscipline Mentoring Program and Professional/Personal Growth Program (P²GP)and is the author of over 40 books, including his latest, Going From Undisciplined to Self-Mastery.

Learn more: Website Amazon

Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Author: I've been writing books for over 20 years and have a passion to help people become more efficient and productive by learning how to be more disciplined.
Is this your first book?
Author: No. I have written over 40 books - too many to list below. Most are posted on www.harriskern.com.
Did you self publish or go the traditional route?
Author: I published in a traditional manner with Koehler Books.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Author: I started working with Prentice hall/Pearson in 1994. It was an incredible experience although, frustrating at times because like most large publishing houses they are slow and bureaucratic. On the flip side they do an awesome job producing a quality book in the end.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Author: You need to have a lot of patience - they don't move quickly. They have no sense of urgency at all.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Author: Yes. The traditional publishing method is the best way to go.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Author: Patience and perseverance. The publishing business works very slow - even after you finish writing your book prepare to wait a few years to actually see your book in print. It takes time to find the right agent who is interested in your work, then for them to trya and sell your work to a publisher.



Sunday, December 28, 2014

Book Publishing Secrets with Greg Byrne

Greg Byrne is an English teacher, grammar consultant, and lecturer. He enjoys exploring places, ideas, history, languages and science, dinners with friends, watching his family grow, and living life’s great adventure. His next projects are a young adult thriller with a twist, developing a grammar teaching system for schools, and writing a grammar text for ESL students. He lives in Perth, Western Australia, with his beloved wife and family and an overweight British Blue.
Thank you for your time in answering our questions about getting published.  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to become an author and pen this book?
Greg: I really had no choice about being an author since both my parents were either writers or lovers of books. As a result, words, stories, languages and books were hardwired into my DNA from conception. I really had no other choice. I also had no choice with Nine Planets. It ambushed me quite amazingly (I was deep in another set of novels at the time, one I abandoned immediately and have never gone back to!) and so I felt unshakeably compelled to write the story of Nine Planets. There was never any question about choice. I had to.
Is this your first book?
Greg: No, my fourth. The first three were high fantasy epics, the ones I abandoned, although I may go back to them later.
With this particular book, how did you publish – traditional, small press, Indie, etc. – and why did you choose this method?
Greg: With small press, and I must say that it is quite delightful to be on first name terms with the publisher himself and to have quite some say in proceedings, in design, editing and other matters. There are certainly trade-offs; larger presses can generate larger publicity and volumes but there are also the less pleasant stories of authors and large presses parting ways. I’m happy where I am. Getting out and talking to bookstore owners has been a valuable part of the publicity process, one I have really enjoyed, and one I may not have experienced so much with a larger house with more publicity power.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?  The pros and cons?
Greg: I was so convinced by the merits of Nine Planets that I took it along the agent route first, convinced that someone was bound to see what a fantastic book it was. When none did, I gave up for a year or so until a friend and fellow author got published by Dragonwell and recommended I approach them. I sent off the ms and waited, and was amazed and shocked some months later when they sent an email saying they wanted to publish.
Agents are wonderful people who can do a lot but getting one is HARD and often luck plays a huge part. I had an agent briefly who was starting his list at the same time as I was querying, but he fell ill and the relationship ended. After that, I tried for years to get another one without success. I briefly toyed with the idea of self-publishing and I know some folks who have gone down that road with success, but those in the publishing game I have spoken to, more often than not, treat self-published books with less enthusiasm.
What lessons do you feel you learned about your particular publishing journey and about the publishing industry as a whole?
Greg: Be prepared to work hard. Don’t assume the publisher will do it all. Get involved with every aspect. Find out how the publishing process works: the editing, contractual arrangements, publicity, pricing, printing, binding, formats, ISBNs, paper stock, fonts . . . the list goes on but the author needs to know every part of it.
The other critical factor of the publishing process is the title, cover design, spine and the production quality of a book. When I go into a bookstore to look for something to read, these aspects of a book strike me first. If these aren’t attractive, the chances are that I won’t even open the book to look at the first five pages.
Would you recommend this method of publishing to other authors?
Greg: Absolutely! Getting involved with the publishing process is really important as I’ve outlined above.  
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Greg: I’ve often heard it said that you only have to keep trying to get successful, particularly with the publishing game. People who say this often quote the JK Rowling story and her long journey where she was rejected many times before Bloomsbury took it on. If she could do it after so much rejection, so can you, aspiring authors are often told.
Could I add to that equation the other quite important parts of (i) a fine story that demands to be told and (ii) the ability to write it. Without these two, all the persistence in the world won’t be of any use, regardless of who you are. So my advice is this, in point form.
  • Get into a writing community. My best ever step in my writing journey was joining the Online Writing Workshop for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. Google it. If you write in a different genre, there’s bound to be an online or face to face writing community that you can join.
  • Share your story with other writers.
  • Ask for honest feedback.
  • Read voraciously, all the while comparing your own story to the best there is in the current market.
  • Review the work of others and ask for reviews of your own.
  • Accept justifiable criticism.
  • Be honest with yourself. Writing for some is an unpaid hobby, for some a passion, and for others a passion with an income attached. Which one are you?